Creating a keggle

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Home Brew in a carbouy. Pages to do with Home Brew:

Creating a keggle

this is a keg kettle, not a keagle!!


We decided to upgrade our system to be able to brew 10 gallon batches at a time.

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We drew a circle on the keg, outlining where we wanted to cut out.

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We opted to use a dremel tool to cut out the lid.

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It took 3.5 of the discs used for cutting metal before the top got cut out and fell into the keg.

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Afterwards we were brave enough to drive a pneumatic grinder to grind down the rough edges - didn't want to cut somebody! We used that for the very rough and sharp edges and then followed up with the dremel tool to sand it down (first with a rough grit and second with a fine grit) - it is now so smooth I can run my fingers over the inside or outside of the edge and it feels like butter!!

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Top is cut out and smoothed down.

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From there, the holes had to be drilled to allow for installation of a ball valve and a sight glass (to be able to determine the volume of liquid in the keggle). I used a 1/8" bit to drill a starter hole and then used a step drill bit to drill a 7/8" hole - just big enough for the bulkheads to fit through! When doing so, make sure you do not drill a hole over one of the pre-existing holes, for if you do it will cause excess heat to escape and affect your fittings.

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after the sightglass was installed on the bottom, a hole had to be made at the top.

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The eyehook was installed and the keggle was ready to be tested, found to be leak tight, and used for brewing!

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