Delta Wood Lathe

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Woodworking Shop


Hive13 Equipment
List of All Documented Equipment
Hive13Lathe.jpg
Consumables
Owner/Loaner: Hive13
Hive13 Asset Tag: None
Make/Model: Delta 46-460 (google)
Arrival Date: 11/2016
Does it work?: Yes
Certification Needed?: No
Contact: Woodworking Warden
Floorplan: 1D
Delta_Wood_Lathe.png



Overview

Manual: File:Manual for Delta Wood Lathe 46-460.pdf

Features:

  • Powerful 1 hp max, 1,725 rpm motor
  • Large 12-1/2-inch swing capacity
  • Electronic variable Speed with three-pulley speed ranges provide the required speeds needed to turn a project without changing belt position
  • Forward and Reversing function allows the turner to achieve a superior finish. Sanding a turned piece with the grain causes the wood fibers to lay down and remain rough.
  • Belt tensioning system for easy and quick speed changes and sets the belt at the correct tension every time for maximum power transfer and longer tool life

Accessories:

  • 4 Jaw Chuck
  • Extension bed - Increases working area to 46". Possible to install one additional extension
  • Knockout bar
  • Spur drive
  • Live center
  • 6" and 10" Tool Rests

Specifications:

  • Motor: 1 HP max, 120V, 60 Hz, 1 Phase
  • Speed: 250-700, 600-1,800 and 1,350-4,000 RPM
  • Swing Over Bed: 12 1/2 in.
  • Swing Over Base: 9 9/16 in.
  • Distance between Centers with Extension: 42 in.
  • Tailstock through Hole: 13/32 in. Self-ejecting
  • Drive Spindle through Hole: 15/32 in.
  • Drive Spindle: 1 in.-8 RH TPI Thread (This is used for attaching faceplates, and other accessories)
  • Head and Tailstock Taper: #2 MT (This is used for any accessory with a taper)

Tools:

  • Set screws on faceplate/chuck 3 mm allen wrench
  • 4 Jaw Chuck screws 4 mm allen wrench


Pic of knockout tool location


Lathe accessories
4 Jaw Nova chuck for wood lathe

Wood Lathe 101 - a basic getting started explanation.

This will need to get edited, but it is a good start for people just starting out with the lathe.


Hello Fellow Woodworkers,

I'm a prospective Hive13 member, likely working on membership later this week.I am currently interested in learning more about the wood lathe, operation, simple technique, and. the part that I find a bit daunting, the sharpening of tools.Would an experienced turner be interested in meeting me at Hive13 to get me started off?Excited to be joining in

Dave Schwinn (BBHN)  15 hours ago

Hi @Todd Fegelman.  For what it is worth several weeks ago a jumped on the wood lathe and it was the first time for me in probably 40+ and I found it to be nearly effortless to get started.  I watched a couple of videos before I did with this one being exceptional for getting started:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kWBzAgqeCmAOne thing that I learned quite quickly was that starting with a piece of hardwood, not softwood, was important.I'd say jump in!  And, as always, be excellent by wearing a mask and cleaning up after yourself.  I have not found a piece of equipment yet that makes a bigger mess than the wood lathe.

Todd Fegelman  15 hours ago

Cool!  Thanks Dave.

Will B  14 hours ago

I would actually suggest starting with a pine 2x2 and cut a few 6” sections and practice using that between centers on the spur drive.

Will B  14 hours ago

The reason for this is:

  1. It is cheap. You are mostly learning tool familiarity at this point.
  2. Being between centers it will be more stable, and less chance of sending it flying.
  3. If it does go flying, it is small and less painful
  4. If it goes flying, it is quick and easy to stick back on the spur drive.
  5. One of the first daunting things to get used to is making square things round.

Will B  14 hours ago

Then once you can confidently make the square things round, then you can start working on your spindle work.

Will B  14 hours ago

There are only 2 things to worry about in spindle work, beads and coves.  But that is because everything on a spindle is either a bead or cove....

Will B  14 hours ago

From there, face turning for things like a platter, are just beads and coves at a 90 degree angle from what you are used to.

Will B  14 hours ago

And bowl turning is just a 2 sided spindle.

Dave Schwinn (BBHN)  14 hours ago

@Todd Fegelman One of the first things I learned at Hive13 is that if you ask 12 people the right way to do something, you'll get 13 answers all claiming to be the only correct way.  My comment about the pine is based on the fact that it can be difficult to get a nice finished surface without gouges in it.  On all of the other points @Will B is correct.

Dave Schwinn (BBHN)  14 hours ago

Until someone else comes along with their opinion...

Todd Fegelman  14 hours ago

Hey Will,

Thanks so much for the guidance.

I really like your suggestion with the 2x2.

Todd Fegelman  14 hours ago

I guess I need to get in there and form mine now...

Will B  14 hours ago

Oh yea, it will be very prone to tear out. No doubt about that. But nothing any of of us made the first few time was a nice decorative piece. And I don’t think you’d really be able to blame the wood for the issues. :)

Dave Schwinn (BBHN)  14 hours ago

Oh great, another opinion...  Welcome to Hive13!

Will B  14 hours ago

But you innately need thinking to yourself, if I screw this up, I’m destroying $0.23 of material.

Will B  14 hours ago

Also, on the topic of sharpening, there are 2 schools of thought. A perfect edge that you spend 5 minutes setting up on jig for the a wet grinder, or a good edge you spend 15 seconds doing on the bench grinder.  You will find you will fall into one group or the other, and are legally required to murder anyone of the other group.

Dave Schwinn (BBHN)  14 hours ago

@Will B Don't you think it's a little presumptuous to think that he is going to screw it up when you've never even met @Todd Fegelman?

Will B  14 hours ago

I assume everything is a race to failure, and the best you chumps can do is vie for second place behind me.

Dave Schwinn (BBHN)  14 hours ago

Agreed, this is why I call my projects "ruining t-shirts"

Will B  14 hours ago

But back to sharpening, I honestly recommend people pickup a CHEAP set from amazon. There is one out there for like $30. They aren’t nice, but they work. And when you are learning to sharpen, so what if you grind extra off to fix a mistake.

Will B  14 hours ago

When you are starting out, the tools will not be the limiting factor.

Will B  14 hours ago

The same reason lacking a $3500 Les Paul is not really the reason my guitar playing does not sound as good as Eric Clapton’s.

Dave Schwinn (BBHN)  14 hours ago

(Clapton plays a strat)

Will B  14 hours ago

Once you start burning up that cheap set, it will be worth investing in the single tool that cost more than the entire cheap set.

Will B  14 hours ago

And the first tool you’ll likely get is a 3/8 gouge that comes with a garbage grind on it. But by that time you’ll have a general idea of the shape of the grind you like on your gouge.

Will B  14 hours ago

The skew chisel is really the only tool you need of all of them because it is the most versatile the best tool there is.  Don’t take it out of the case for the first 6 months.

Will B  14 hours ago

It is the hardest to learn to use properly, and it is easy to get yourself in trouble with it when you are first starting because you can either cut with the heel or the toe, but NOT both at the same time. That is when bad things begin occurring.

Dave Schwinn (BBHN)  14 hours ago

I think we scared him away

Will B  14 hours ago

I’m mostly typing at this point so I can copy it out and put it on the wiki as a basic getting started list. ... like I said the past 2 times people have asked about getting started with the lathe...

Will B  14 hours ago

Err, previous 2 times...

Will B  14 hours ago

I’m now thinking it should just go up like this.  Completely unedited. With all comments intact.

Dave Schwinn (BBHN)  14 hours ago

Blessed be